The top 5 ways to make your habits stick -- for good

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The top 5 ways to make your habits stick -- for good

Kelsey Hergott |

September holds a certain type of nostalgia, doesn’t it? Whether you’re going back to school, sending your little ones off to the bus, or find your commute suddenly crowded with teens who are much cooler than you, there’s something about the September air that brings a sense of hustle and bustle back after the lazy, hazy days of summer. 

 

That’s exactly why September is notoriously known as the number one time of the year when people find it tough to stick with their habits. When life has less priorities, you can always put yourself first. But when reality hits, and the days get shorter but feel longer, how can you stay on track?

 

Here’s the great part: September is actually the best time to install a new habit or routine. 

 

That is as long as you know how to work yourself into your days, and stick with it. 

 

Here are some tips on embracing September as your new New Year and how you can make your new fitness regime last longer than your tan:

 

Get real with yourself

  • Have an honest conversation with yourself about why you’ve fallen off track in the past. Be candid while analyzing what may have caused your slip ups, and think about how you can work to consciously reverse it in the future. Once you realize what it is that has been holding you back, you’ll see that all of your routines are in fact tied together -- and once you have one routine down pat, the rest will follow.

 

Give your habit a buddy

  • This might sound funny, but pairing your habits with one another can help you to make sure they stick. Like I said above, all routines are tied together in one way or another. Maybe you want to wake up early and start going to the gym. Those two new habits go together perfectly, whereas having a green tea every morning isn’t closely related to reading a new book every month, so they wouldn’t be much help when forming a new habit. When one habit relies on the other, the quicker they get installed and stuck to.

 

What gets scheduled gets done

  • Give yourself and your new routine a timed schedule so you have physical accountability to get it done. This way when you wake up in the morning, you’ll see exactly what you need to get accomplished, and at exactly what time. Remember, the things that get scheduled are the things that get done. That includes squats!

 

Get tracking

  • If you struggle to hold yourself accountable, why not try tracking your habits? You can either map out a large habit board in your office, use a journal, or try a tracking app on your phone. If you’re one of those people who enjoy the satisfaction a checkmark brings, this might be the perfect way to keep you accountable, and keep you moving.

 

Tell your friends and family

  • This is another great way to hold yourself accountable, but also might get those around you curious and eager to join you! Even if your inner-circle isn’t looking to cultivate the same habits you are, receiving their support and encouragement can be all you need to remind yourself why you started in the first place -- especially on the hard days. 

 

So let’s face it, building a new routine into an already hectic life can be a challenge, sure. But it’s possible! It can take 66 days to install a new habit, so give yourself some grace, understanding, and patience as you start to embark on your new journey. 

 

If you’re ready to kick yourself into gear this month, then why not step up to the plate and register for our September Challenge!? It all kicks off on Tuesday, September 14th and will be 30 full days of sweaty focus as together we work towards fueling your body, mind, and soul. 

 

Oh, and did I mention this September Challenge is in celebration of the 1 year anniversary of our SWK App?! There are definitely going to be some surprises in store…

 

So be sure to join us on September 14th and get ready to spend 30 days creating new routines and habits that will stick with you for the long haul. 

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